How to harness the power of influencer marketing

Influencer marketing can often feel like a confusing minefield, it is increasingly, however, a huge aspect of digital marketing and one which should never be underestimated. As an independent brand who has seen the real and huge benefits it can offer, I wanted to bring you my top tips for working with influencers.

I am Gabi Cox, the founder of Chroma Stationery, an online business proving colour loving personalised and branded stationery for both individuals through my website and in bulk to fellow brands and businesses. Chroma is all about creating bespoke and affordable stationery that truly reflects the personality of you or your business.

I established Chroma Stationery whilst in my final year of university. It was a uni project and after putting hundreds of hours, countless all-nighters and a lot of stress into the brand, after graduating, I didn’t want to let it go. I decided to take all the work I’d created and launch the business ‘for real’, running a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign to raise the initial funding I needed to afford my embossing machine and the first 1,000 notebooks. Since November 2014 I have sold to individual customers across 28 countries and in bulk to brands including ITV, Max Factor, Boots and American Airlines. The brand has grown from strength to strength with new team members, an office space and a lot of new products.

chroma stationery
Chroma Stationery’s products are fun and colourful.

One strategy which has been fundamental from day one has been our work with influencers. I started this with very little background knowledge or idea of how it worked but over the past 3.5 years have established an influencer marketing strategy which works; with social media and YouTube mentions from the likes of Zoella, Lily Pebbles and Louise Pentland.


The amount of planning you put in before implementing your influencer strategy will directly effect how successful it is. Just some of the things you should consider include:

Micro vs major influencers?
It is easy to send out some samples or stock to all the top influencers, the ones with millions of followers. But if they and their audience don’t fit with your brand, it will be a waste of time. Instead, opt for micro influencers who reflect your own target audience. Often these influencers, although don’t have millions of followers, do have a very loyal and engaged audience.

Focus on engagement not followers
With the ability to buy followers, this can no longer be an accurate representation of someones success or real reach. Looking at a posts engagement (comments, likes etc) will show you how many people actually engage with an influencers work. It shouldn’t just be a numbers game but also about the quality of the engagement.

chroma stationery
Don’t expect content in return for a free gift.

Know their audience
Knowing the audience of your ideal influencer is crucial and shouldn’t be underestimated. Always do your research. Sending out your new leather purses to a vegan influencer is not going to be a good fit. Make sure that your brand aligns itself with the influencers you reach out to; this is so important to you both and helps to ensure a great partnership.

Build sustainable relationships
Working with an influencer should never be about getting as much as you can from them, for as little as possible. It’s about building sustainable working relationships between two businesses.

What is your budget?
There are two ways to utilise influencer marketing, paid and unpaid. Paid is more of a collaborative option, working together with a person to create content that promote your brand. Unpaid is where you send an influencer products for free, in the hopes or with an agreement to post about them. Knowing your budget and where this might limit you is key before getting started.

chroma stationery
Sending a personalised product shows thought and attention to detail.

Sending something for free?
Don’t expect anything. You are not paying the influencer for their time or effort, you therefore aren’t really in a position to demand content. You can work hard to create a product they’ll love, send it at a great time, cross your fingers and hope they love it enough to mention it (Hey Zoella!) but you can’t expect anything for free or be annoyed if they don’t post.

Approach an influencer as equal, fellow business person
Bloggers and Youtubers get a lot of hard press, with some not seeing the value, time or effort it takes to do the work they do. As a brand or business you should always work and interact with an influencer as a fellow, equal businessperson. You are looking to create lasting partnerships and working relationships not quick business wins.

The importance of personalisation
This comes down to both product and interaction. Sending a product which has a personalised touch or shows that extra effort has gone into it can make a lot of difference. With regards to interaction, do not blanket send out the same email or Insta message, copy and pasted to everyone you’d like to work with. Each interaction should be unique, thought out and on brand.

By doing your research and following just a few simple steps, you can really utilise & work with influencers for mutual benefit.

Mother of all tribes

Meet Danni McCabe, owner of Mama Tribe, a fantastic hub of information for mums all over the UK. It’s a curated business directory listing everything from retail brands selling covetable products, to groups which host events and small businesses offering a range of services. Plus it also features regular articles from women on a range of topics including motherhood and digital marketing advice (as a regular contributor I’m proud to be part of the tribe). The concept was born out of a passion for the social media scene and a desire to find a better work-life balance.

Tell us about your career to date

I left London nine years ago and moved to the Cotswolds with my husband to start a family, but continued to commute to work in London until I went on maternity leave. Our eldest boy, Monroe is now seven.

There was no option for me to work remotely and with no family on hand to help, it would mean leaving our baby in nursery and wrap around care for up to 12 hours a day. So I chose not to return to my job as manager of a health club and instead went about setting up my first business.

Sadly, that business came to a very unexpected end! After just a few years trading, there was a fire in the flat above my bridal boutique. It took them 16 months to repair the building and the effect on my business, my ability to trade from a temporary office space was detrimental, so I had to closedown.

It’s not all bad though, firstly it gave us the time to go through IVF and after three rounds, I managed to get pregnant with our second little miracle boy Lorne, who is now two. Secondly I realized that the retail business I had created didn’t offer me as much flexibility as I’d hoped. So that’s when the idea for Mama Tribe started to develop.

What sparked the idea of Mama Tribe?

During the newborn days whilst feeding my second son, I started following different bloggers and became addicted to Instagram. I become aware of the number of women choosing or finding they were unable to return to work after having a baby because of the effects it had on their family life. Instead, they were choosing to go it alone and putting their years of experience and skills into new business ideas that they could create from home or around their family.

In many ways this isn’t a new phenomenon, women have been setting up their own small businesses for years, but what did seem different, was the way in which social media, in particular Instagram, was allowing these businesses to market themselves in a professional manner from their kitchen tables.

Via Instagram I became aware of these women in business and was drawn to their creative brands. I wanted to support them, buy from them and promote them. I became a brand rep for a number of the brands and became more involved in the Insta-shop community.

My attention then turned to the new type of business networking groups. The first one I came across was Mothers Meeting, set up by Jenny Scott in London, running motivational workshops, sharing advice, resources and inspiration.

Being based in the Cotswolds, as an ex London girl, I felt out of this loop and unable to access this network. I was just about to set up my own local version, when I found out about other groups setting up across the UK. Other business orientated women felt the same as me, they wanted access to this type of network and community.

So that’s when I came up with the idea to create a national hub, a directory dedicated to this new community. That was unique in its effort to profile all of these new groups, but also listed all of the Insta-Shops I’d grown to love and other businesses set up by women. I was a mother with a baby whilst all of this was developing, but I felt there needed to be a resource for future new mums to tap in to, to find out all about and connect with like minded, business savvy women.

What are your aspirations are for the business?

On the website you can find independent brands and businesses set up by women or for women, with a focus on supporting women that are mamas or hope to be. As more people hear about Mama Tribe, the community will grow, the directories will expand and so will the opportunities to network, support, collaborate and promote each other. Together we can become a strong, talented workforce of women raising our tribes.

How do you manage juggling a business with being a mum to two young children?

It’s exhausting, sometimes frustrating and stressful, but I love it! I love the flexibility, I like that I choose when I want to work, go to the park, or chill out at home and watch a movie with my boys. I’m learning to manage my own anxieties and the pressure I put on myself. I work hard (anyone that knows me, knows my brain doesn’t stop) so for me, my focus is to switch off and give myself time off with my boys. Things like housework have become less of a priority or concern. I got a cleaner, so the house is clean and the mess is just toys, dumped clothes and shoes mainly. I’ve come to realise it’s not worth worrying about.

Danni is following…

I follow so many inspirational women online, it’s hard to narrow it down. I have over 130 businesses involved so far, but it’s growing daily and I’m so proud of all the talented women that are part of the tribe. However, there is one lady that does stand out to me and that’s Anna AKA Mother Pukka. She is followed by thousands because she is honest, motivating, inspiring and very funny. She has a way with words and poetically portrays the truth, the real highs and lows of motherhood, whilst passionately campaigning for flexible work opportunities for parents. If you’re not already following her, then do.